The Future of Civil Service

By on June 15, 2005 in Current Events with 0 Comments

What will the federal government’s civil service structure look like in another five years?

Will the trend to decrease the importance of seniority continue and expand throughout all agencies? Will the federal appeals processes become more streamlined with fewer options and faster decisions? Will labor unions continue to lose clout and power? Will the process of becoming a federal employee change based on test scores?

We are now part of a global society. Manufacturing of goods is largely being done in other countries with lower wages and benefits and products shipped to America for consumption. The internet is pervasive and expanding options for running a business (and government).

Defined pension plans are becoming increasingly rare and companies that have these plans are often established companies that have had the plans for decades. Many of these companies are being forced to retrench in the face of competition from newer companies with lower expenses. The federal government is picking up responsibility for some of the former employees of these companies that have gone into bankruptcy with the result being lower pensions and less lucrative retirement options.

The federal civil service structure is not immune to these changes. Significant change is already well underway in the Departments of Homeland Security and Defense. The administration is seriously considering similar changes in human resources programs for the rest of government as well.

What is your opinion on the changes for the federal civil service? Will the changes be implemented and, if they are implemented, will they create a government that works better and costs less?

© 2016 Ralph R. Smith. All rights reserved. This article may not be reproduced without express written consent from Ralph R. Smith.


About the Author

Ralph Smith has several decades of experience working with federal human resources issues. He has written extensively on a full range of human resources topics in books and newsletters and is a co-founder of two companies and several newsletters onĀ federal human resources.