Dealing with NSPS Job Objectives that Need Help

By on August 25, 2008 in Current Events with 0 Comments

By

Kathryn Troutman and

Nancy Segal

_______________________

If you are working on your National Security Personnel System Self-Assessment for year end, are you struggling with Job Objectives that need help? Some agencies and offices are producing mandatory Job Objectives that were developed for everyone in the office. Are you trying to figure out how to relate your accomplishments to your job objectives?

YOU CANNOT CHANGE YOUR JOB OBJECTIVES NOW

At this point, you can’t change your objectives, even if they aren’t perfect or totally on point with your "real" objectives. You will have to work with what you have and write your self assessment using examples that best demonstrate that you have met those objectives.

NEEDS HELP – JOB OBJECTIVE THAT SOUNDS LIKE A DUTIES SECTION OF A FEDERAL RESUME:

Let’s look at a real NSPS job objective that is more like the "duties" section of a resume or position description:

Solicits, listens to & resolves customer concerns or elevates them to HQUSACE and Army Senior level management for appropriate and timely resolution 90% of the time. – Provides timely, clear and accurate communication with internal/external Customers 90% of the time. – Actively represents and participates on customer’s behalf in HQUSACE environmental program related meetings, and Environmental National Account Managers program review meetings 90% of the time. – As applicable, conduct regular dialogues with Environmental National Account Managers and MSC/RIT Environmental Program Managers for situational awareness to ascertain issues for resolution 90% of the time.
Contributing factor: Communication

SOLUTION: You will have to carefully analyze what your office has written and dissect the job objective and figure out what is really expected.

BETTER JOB OBJECTIVE VERSION FOR YOUR THINKING AND WRITING THIS YEAR:

"Communicate with customers, represent the agency and customer at technical meetings, provide ongoing communication on situations and resolve problems."

NOW WRITE 3 OR 4 ACCOMPLISHMENTS:

Focusing on the above statement, you can write 3 or 4 Accomplishments or examples that demonstrate you have met your agency mission and achieved your Job Objective. Now you have something to work with!! Start to think about what you accomplished this year that is related to being proactive with customers, representing the agency effectively and customer service. Identify 3-4 for strong examples; these will be the basis for your self assessment on this element.

FOR FY 2009 SELF-ASSESSMENT:

Pay attention to your job objectives! Good self assessments start with good job objectives. When you sit down with your supervisor to develop next year’s performance plan, take the time to write clear, concise SMART or GOALS job objectives.

MORE INFORMATION: SMART and GOALS

Objectives Formats, Self-Assessment Samples, keywords, personal empowerment writing style, and instruction for writing accomplishments are available in Writing Your NSPS Self-Assessment by Kathryn Troutman and Nancy Segal. You can order a copy through this website.

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Kathryn Troutman is a Federal Career Consultant, Federal Agency Career Trainer, Author, Publisher, and President of www.resume-place.com, a consulting practice and publisher in Catonsville, MD. A successful career trainer, she is the author of Federal Resume Guidebook, Ten Steps to a Federal Job, and several other books. She is a frequent television and radio commentator and guest. She is a regular contributor to monster.com, military.com, govcentral.com and other federal employment websites.

Nancy Segal is a Federal Career Trainer, Certified Federal Resume Writer and Federal Career Consultant out of Chicago, IL. A successful government trainer, she has trained NSPS employees, supervisors and agency human resources specialists in NSPS for more than two years. Nancy is an expert keyword analyst for Department of Defense employees for career documents. Previously Ms. Segal was a human resources specialist with several federal agencies and became an expert and advocate for federal employees seeking advancement and career change.

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