Honoring 50 Years of Service

By on July 14, 2009 in Current Events with 0 Comments

It’s a mile marker not too many of us pass in our federal careers — 50 years of service. But John Powell — an expeditor at the Evansville, IN, mail processing and distribution center — did just that.

Powell, 72, says when he began his career with the Postal Service he made $2 an hour, “and I was happy. That was a nice paying job.”

He worked in his hometown of Bicknell, IN, as a part-time clerk carrier before transferring in 1973 to Evansville.

“Back then, we didn’t have automation. We worked all of the letters and flats by hand,” Powell said. “Today, a machine can run thousands of pieces per hour and now they’ve sequencing flats for carriers.

“We had what we called the Highway Post Office,” he explained. “A big bus would come down from Indianapolis to Evansville and make pickups from different offices.

Then they’d turn around and head back to Indianapolis. It was similar to trains and they had it set up to where they could work the mail as they picked it up from each office,” he said.

“My co-workers ask me how long I’ve worked at the Post Office. I tell them that I was the last of the Pony Express riders and that I even had my horse stuffed,” he said with a laugh.

“I’ve stayed around because I enjoy the work, and I’m in good health,” he said. “Everybody has been asking me when I’m going to retire and I say when I reach 50 years, I’ll start thinking about it.”

Perhaps as his anniversary date came and went, he’ll start saying when he reaches 55 years he’ll start thinking about it. “The Postal Service has been a good company to me,” he said.

© 2016 Marilyn Jones. All rights reserved. This article may not be reproduced without express written consent from Marilyn Jones.

About the Author

Marilyn Jones has been a journalist for more than 30 years and is currently a freelance feature writer specializing in travel. Her articles have appeared in major newspapers including the BostonGlobe, Akron Beacon Journal and Chicago Sun-Times as well as regional travel magazines.

Visit her website at travelwithmarilyn.com

Top