Open Season and Your Health Insurance

By on October 22, 2013 in Current Events with 101 Comments

Health insurance has been a lead topic in the media for several years. For those current or retired federal employees who may be wondering what health insurance policy is the best one for you, the “open season” for the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHB) is coming up soon. Each year, Open Season runs from the Monday of the second full workweek in November through the Monday of the second full workweek in December. This is your chance to switch to a different policy if you decide that is in your best interest.

As a quick reference, you can check out all of the premiums for insurance plans under the FEHB at FedsDataCenter.com. You can narrow your search by state, name of the plan in which you are most interested, or the type of plan such as a fee for service plan or a health maintenance organization (HMO).

This year, open season will run from Monday November 11, 2013 – Monday December 9, 2013.

During the annual FEHB Open Season, you can enroll in an insurance plan, cancel an enrollment, change plans or options, and waive or begin participation in premium conversion. If you waived participation in premium conversion, you can change from self- and-family enrollment to a Self Only enrollment or cancel your enrollment at any time. You can make other changes during Open Season or due to certain events. Your servicing Human Resources Office should be able to give you more information about these events.

What is Premium Conversion?

Federal employees can use pre-tax dollars to pay for health insurance premiums to the FEHB. Premium conversion uses Federal tax rules to allow current federal employees to deduct their share of health insurance premiums from their taxable income which effectively reduces their taxes. Premium conversion for Federal Employees enrolled in the FEHB Program went into effect in October 2000.

Health Insurance Changes and Federal Employees

A number of readers have written in to ask if they will have to join the new health exchanges created by the new Obamacare system instead of the FEHB. In a recent survey, about 92% of those responding did not want to give up their insurance under the FEHB to join one of the new health insurance exchanges. While legislation has been introduced to require federal employees to use the new health care system, the legislation has not passed.

And, in good news for the the federal workforce, most of the significant changes now occurring in our health care process will not impact federal employees, in part because some of the changes now required by the new law are already included in the federal insurance plans. The estimated 14 million people who purchase their own health insurance coverage because it was not available through their employer may not be as fortunate as the requirements will make mandatory changes in many policies.

Reportedly, hundreds of thousands of Americans who previously paid for their own health insurance coverage are now seeing their health insurance cancelled or the health insurance premiums go up dramatically. Insurers argue the cancellations and rate increases are necessary because the policies to not meet the requirements the Affordable Care Act requires beginning on January 1, 2014. Some companies are canceling a large percentage of the policies issued in some states.

At the same time, some private sector policyholders will qualify for government subsidies.  Also, policyholders with limited coverage for their medical conditions may get plans with better benefits and the policies at a lower rate under the new health care system. It would not be surprising for insurance companies t0 discourage policyholders with a greater risk of requiring expensive coverage by charging more for the premium and effectively encouraging them to enroll under the government healthcare exchanges instead.

But, while federal employees are largely immune from the changes that are occurring, this does not mean that your insurance premiums will remain the same. Many federal employees and retirees will see some increase in their premiums in 2014. Everyone should check out the new rates as one step in deciding which policy may be the best one for you in the coming year.

Here are a few answers to some of the most common questions we hear from readers about their federal health insurance.

When I change plans, what date will it be effective? 

Open Season changes for most Federal employees are effective the first day of the first full pay period that begins in January. Generally, mid-year changes are effective on the first day of the pay period which begins after your enrollment is received by your Human Resources Office.

Since I Have FEHB Coverage, Do I Need Medicare Coverage? 

If you are entitled to Part A without paying the premiums, you should take it, according to OPM, even if you are still working. This may help cover some of the costs that your FEHB plan may not cover, such as deductibles, coinsurance, and charges that exceed the plan’s allowable charges. There are other advantages to Part A, such as (if you also enroll in Part B,) being eligible to enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan. (Also see Medicare: Part B or Not Part B)

Can I Change My FEHB Enrollment When I Become Eligible for Medicare? 

You may change your FEHB enrollment to any available plan or option at any time beginning 30 days before you become eligible for Medicare. You may use this enrollment change opportunity only once. You may also change your enrollment during the annual Open Season, or because of another event that permits enrollment changes (such as a change in family status).

Do FEHB Plans and Medicare Cover the Same Types of Expenses? 

Generally, plans under the FEHB Program help pay for the same kind of expenses as Medicare. FEHB plans also provide coverage for emergency care outside of the United States which Medicare doesn’t provide. Some FEHB plans also provide coverage for dental and vision care. Medicare covers some orthopedic and prosthetic devices, durable medical equipment, home health care, limited chiropractic services, and some medical supplies, which some FEHB plans may not cover or only partially cover (check your plan brochure for details).

Can I Reenroll in FEHB If I Disenroll From the Medicare Advantage Plan? 

If you provide documentation to your retirement system that you are suspending your FEHB coverage to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan, you may reenroll in FEHB if you later lose or cancel your Medicare Advantage plan coverage. However, you must wait until the next Open Season to reenroll in FEHB, unless you involuntarily lose your coverage under the Medicare Advantage plan (including because the plan is discontinued or because you move outside its service area). In this case, you may reenroll from 31 days before to 60 days after you lose the Medicare Advantage plan coverage, and your reenrollment in FEHB will be effective the day after the Medicare Advantage plan coverage ends (or ended).

If I join a plan because my doctor is a participating doctor or specialist and then my doctor drops out of my plan’s network in the middle of the year, can I switch plans?

No. You would need to wait for Open Season. It is not uncommon for providers to leave plans mid-year. Other plan providers will be available to provide care.

Open Season changes for most Federal employees are effective the first day of the first full pay period that begins in January. Generally, mid-year changes are effective on the first day of the pay period which begins after your enrollment is received by your Human Resources Office.

Another plan has some extra services that I can’t get in my own plan. When is the next time I can change plans? 

You can change plans during the annual FEHB Open Season and whenever you have a qualifying life events (QLE) — such as marriage. Becoming aware of another plan that has better benefits, even if you didn’t expect to want the extra benefits when you had a chance to change plans before, does not qualify as a “QLE” that allows you to change plans.

What Will You Do?

If you decide to change your health insurance among the plans available to you in your area, the open season coming up is your best chance to do this. Even if you do not change policies, you should check out the premiums for your current health insurance policy under the FEHB so you know what your expenses will be for this employee benefit in 2014.

© 2016 Ralph R. Smith. All rights reserved. This article may not be reproduced without express written consent from Ralph R. Smith.

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About the Author

Ralph Smith has several decades of experience working with federal human resources issues. He has written extensively on a full range of human resources topics in books and newsletters and is a co-founder of two companies and several newsletters on federal human resources.

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  1. Chris says:

    I think may federal employees are going to be shocked when they see their new premiums. The increase for many employees will be way more the the advertised 3.7%. My FEHB CareFirst Health insurance plan is going up by 35% for 2014.

  2. Chris says:

    The ACA for or against is not a political argument. We can argue all day on the philosophical ideas of universal healthcare and get nowhere as those are opinions. The ACA is a failure out the gate because of MATH. You want to argue mathematical answers? The few cannot support the many. The healthy cannot financially support the sick and/or the subsidized. It cannot add up mathematically? Stop the political arguments and look at the math.

  3. DJ says:

    Amazing to me how the people who are against the ACA are not affected by it. After all, you can insure children on your current plan until age 26, after that they are responsible. Who pays when they go to emergency room? The difference in cost for insured vs uninsured is evident in your billing statement by amount charged and amount paid. Tell me who pays the full amount for uninsured…we do.

    • Rambo1957 says:

      If someone decides to pay the tax instead of buying insurance goes to the emergency room he/she will still be treated. Perhaps they will pay their bill. But if they refuse? The hospital still gets stuck. So we will still pay for that plus subsidize millions and probably will pay more ourselves to make up for the costs for features provided for those with pre existing conditions. So essentially, we will still pay for the uninsured.

    • steve5656546346 says:

      Obamacare is unworkably complex–as we are starting to see. It puts the FEDERAL government (not a company, nor state or local governments) much deeper into our personal lives. It will, in fact, cost taxpayers much money–one way or another.

      Everybody has a right as a citizen to oppose a law that was not even read prior to it being passed.

    • hogyld says:

      and who is paying for the ACA??? We Are. Which is better, the former rather than the latter.

    • wombat1951 says:

      If you are a taxpayer, you are affected by it because it’s going to blow a hole in the national debt over the next few years.

      If you suddenly hear that you don’t have your favorite doctor because he was forced to quit his practice based on Obamacare mandates and regulations, you’ll be affected a whole lot.

      • Steve Neal says:

        And guess what public subsidy program will be the most likely to fold when our gov’t runs short of money and credit? PPACA subsidies… Then each of us, rich or poor, will be paying the full insurance premiums or opting out of coverage, then Uncle Sam will withhold/deduct your annual penalty fees directly from your pay or your tax refund. They’ve “got you by the short-hairs”, you see…

    • Keeg says:

      And you now pay for them to be insured. Where did you think these subsidies for people were going to come from? A medical device tax? It is with all those taxes and rising premiums/deductibles you will be hit with.

  4. Rob says:

    It’s pretty ironic that the people who will pay the largest premiums under the ACA (the young) are the ones most responsible for putting Obama in the White House. This certainly brings meaning to the old saying, “be careful what you ask for….”

    • theinnerring says:

      really? because i checked our state exchange and the younger you are the less you pay. insurance 101

      • steve5656546346 says:

        Government 101: bankrupting the government will fall most heavily on those who have still many years to live.

      • Rob says:

        The younger you are the less you pay? Insurance 101? My teenage drivers would love it if the auto insurance industry worked that way. Actually the young are paying the higher premiums under the ACA. If this thing worked like normal insurance then the high-risk would pay more, but the ACA is everything but normal.

      • Fella says:

        You’re kidding, right? I mean, sure a 4 y/o pays less than a 30 y/o because they pay nothing.. Look, the ONLY way the program sustains is by pushing the burden on the young and healthy. That’s why they REFUSE to delay the mandate by even one year. That’s why Obama is trying to make this sound so enticing to young people. It’ll cost billions if the young and healthy don’t sign up will and be shown as the fraud of a program it is.

        • skisok says:

          If you like the FHEB, than you like the idea of everyone paying the same amount. The young may otherwise pay less if another group plan of young people was available, but then, what happens to them when they get old. That is the strength of the FEHB. You may the same young or old. You pay more up front and less on the back end.

          • Fella says:

            I like to pay what insurance says I should pay based on statisics and equitability. I haven’t been in a car accident since I was 17, and have never been in one that’s my fault. That being said, I still understand why my insurance was higher when I was a kid. Statistically I was more of a liability. That’s also equitable (not fair). Statisically, in the age group that I’m in, with the lifestyle choices I make, I’m less of a liability. Equitability would say that I SHOULD pay less than the older and less heathly. To sustain ACA, the pricing model is so that it goes against everything that factors into pricing. Am I saying that old, unhealthy, preexisting, etc., should pay the majority? No, I’m saying that ACA doesn’t work. The younger generation is already getting the shaft as far as jobs go. People are working longer meaning fewer promotions (fewer jobs in general), more student debt and an exponentially rising national debt. Now the thought is to burden the next generation with paying for a lions share of the health care?

          • skisok says:

            That’s how it works under the FHEB and I’m not complaining and neither did I when I was much younger. The system worked.

    • LaborAttorney says:

      My adult children are happy he’s in the White House regardless of healthcare costs.

      • Fella says:

        I’m not. I like properiety and growth. I like the idea that I get to keep the money I work for. I like having the ability to take risks with my money to make it grow and provide a better life for myself. I like having some freedom from the government. I like knowing that I’m safe from terrorists and other bad people around the globe. I like knowing my boarders are secure and we aren’t rubbing in the face of legal immigrants that if they would have entered illegally they’d have gotten to the same place but far easier. I also like parts of Obamacare, but not how it’s written because it’s fiscally insane. I like when others are held accountable for their actions. I like helping others, but I don’t like free handouts where we see nothing in return.

      • Steve Neal says:

        One of mine is dillusional also, corrupted by the liberal college education he got in the northwest, and covered by the medical research facility for which he works. However, my oldest, now a combat pilot’s wife, remains a staunch conservative. When we gather for holidays, “politics” is off-limits… LOL

  5. Keeg says:

    Welcome to rising rates and growing deductibles….the specter of things to come.

    • Ross200 says:

      In the last 35 years, when have premiums and deductible not increased ?

      • HRGuy71 says:

        Get ready for socialized medicine. Fewer doctors, more paperwork, longer lines, fewer doctors accepting patients, especially those on medicare, concierge doctors for those that can afford it, many fewer doctors in private practice, and medical care that is deteriorating. Perhaps everyone will now have the same level of (inferior) health care. From the WSJ on October 23rd.

        “The forecast shortage of doctors has become a real problem. It started in 2014 when the ACA cut $716 billion from Medicare to accommodate 30 million newly “insured” people through an expansion of Medicaid. More important, the predicted shortage of 42,000 primary-care physicians and that of specialists (such as heart surgeons) was vastly underestimated. It didn’t take into account the ACA’s effect on doctors retiring early, refusing new patients or going into concierge medicine. These estimates also ignored the millions of immigrants who would be seeking a physician after having been granted legal status….With the best and most successful doctors disappearing into concierge medicine or refusing new Medicare and Medicaid patients, replacing these experienced physicians with bright young doctors to work with the “general public” has become difficult. Why? Because such doctors are hard to find—going into medicine doesn’t have the professional allure it once did.”

        • Anonymous says:

          It’s either:
          1. Should these people die? Yes or no. Nobody ever seems to answer that
          or
          2. Offer an alternative to the ACA. Nobody seems to do that, either. Please do not say that the current system is sustainable.
          It’s one of the other.

          • steve5656546346 says:

            There were indeed specific proposals to improve healthcare other than Obamacare: did you not know that? If not, why not? Because the press hardly mentioned it?

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            One proposal was to limit malpractice suits to 250K. So Steve if your doctor removes your right kidney instead of your diseased left kidney, do you want to be limited by 250K or God forbid he removes your penis instead of your appendix? Yes the Republicans have made some suggestions but that is all they have done is make suggestions, no laws implemented at all.

          • Fella says:

            No laws implemented at all? Let’s pretend they put out a GREAT plan. Their plan solves every single one of these problems… It still falls on deaf ears. The democrats (mainnly Obama and Reid) won’t let anything happen to their healthcare bill. Until Obama is out of office the point is moot.

          • LaborAttorney says:

            Those “proposals” were insane! They basically were: 1) handing you a voucher for a fraction of the cost of coverage (notwithstanding the exclusion of pre-existing conditions or the inability to obtain coverage at all); and 2) Now go away.

          • Hopeisnot_A_Plan says:

            That is really an oversimplification of proposals offered by the House.

          • Rambo1957 says:

            Who is going to die? We all die. People die because of health care. Water down the system because of a perception that someone may die? You assume the ACA will be better. Will it? Will the costs be worth it? Will people die because of it? Who knows?

          • Hopeisnot_A_Plan says:

            I will offer you an alternative. I think every liberal that thinks the ACA is an answer should adopt a family that does not have insurance. If you want someone else to pay for their insurance why not you?

        • theinnerring says:

          if you have socialized medicine there will be no medicare/medicaid, it would all be, you know, socialized.

          the loss of many physicians from healthcare has as much to do with their current working conditions as many other factors. many are now employees rather than having a private practice. they, for many years, have had patient quotas, time limitations, become part of a large corporate entity.

          the paperwork is an issue that’s been around for many years. there are many, many insurance plans, all of which do things differently especially in regards to what is covered and what is not, how much is paid, prior auth requirements, etc. it’s a nightmare NOT related to the ACA.

          the US currently, and for awhile, is nowhere near providing the best care in the world but many countries offering socialized medicine are.

          • steve5656546346 says:

            So, why do people come to the US for health care if they can afford it for serious issues?

            I’m sure you will enjoy waiting lists and healthcare rationing: I just wish you had not dragged me into it.

          • LaborAttorney says:

            Many Americans without insurance have gone outside the country for affordable elective surgeries.

          • Rambo1957 says:

            Perhaps for risky procedures not offered here?

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            For everyone who comes to the US for healthcare, two go else where for medical care. Consider drugs manufactured in the US, shipped to Canada who ships them to patients in the US at a discount. Why??????????

          • AvgFed says:

            Thanks to the ACA now more and more of us will be forced to go else where.

          • Hopeisnot_A_Plan says:

            That is a problem caused by Congress, not the medical professionals or the insurance industry.

          • skisok says:

            And why does the US have a mortality rate that is worse than Cuba?

          • Ross200 says:

            I had a routine a minor surgical procedure in January. The surgeon had three clerical employees working for him, handling arrangements and dealing with health care plans. If we had a single payer system, he would only need one assistant.

          • OldRet says:

            ..and that assistant would say ‘Sorry, that is not authorized” or “That procedure is unavailable to you at this time”. It’s slowly coming. Obama, Biden and the liberals want you to be DEPENDENT on them and call the shots. There is no doubt about that!

            http://www.lasvegassun.com/new

            http://www.nationalreview.com/

          • mandinka says:

            UTTER nonsense name just 1 country and I can show you that they don’t hold a candle to what’s available in the US

          • skisok says:

            The medical care industry has become to greedy. They forget that they signed the Hypocratic Oath, that they will devote their lifes to helping the sick and the infirmed just like priests devote themselves to God. The Hypocratic Oatyh says noting about renumeration. Read it yourself. I have.

        • Dave Larochelle says:

          HRGuy71, who (which country) are the happiest people in the world? Certainly not the USA. It is Denmark. Do you know why? OK, I know you don’t know, but it is due to social issues such as “free” health care, free education and the family comes first with parental leave. It does come with a price-tag no doubt, but these people do not worry about health care and education, both of which are huge nightmares to parents in the USA. Just a thought. Also, every Canadian I have ever spoken to about their health care system absolutely loves it. Time for Republicans and Democrats to arrive at a workable solution because ours is near broke.

          • Keeg says:

            Really? Interesting because every Canadian I have talked to hates their system.

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            Yes, really. Are you talking to Canadians or Republicans? I have dozens of family that love it. I have a colleague who had to have a bone marrow transplant because of cancer and she swears by it. Did you talk to one person?

          • Keeg says:

            Dozens actually, but hey WTH – it could be thousands and you would have another snarky little comment to make.

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            Snarky is as snarky does.

          • mandinka says:

            I worked in down town Detroit and got to watch the daily stream of ambulances bring their heart and other serious patients to the US hospitals everyday. Remember the Canadians just like EVERY country that has single payer HC has a “personal pay” insurance that runs side by side. With separate facilities and its a different world

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            What does Detroit have to do with Canada?

          • skisok says:

            I have talked to people from Canada, England, Australia and Greece and they all love their healthcare and would not trade it for the health care we have. Just look at mortality rates, and you can tell it’s not that good here.

          • AvgFed says:

            It is not such a stretch for the Danesto love their health care. The people of that country are not as diverse as we are. They are a homogenious group with healthy life-styles. Health care in such a country would cost less anyway.
            And for all the free things costing something. Go to that country and see the size of the average home, size of the refrigerator, whether they have existing dish washers (OK is is the homemaker!), automobiles, air conditioning, even a second set of dishes for entertaining. As Oprah asked one family, “Where is all your stuff?” Answer, “What stuff.”
            We can do without a lot of stuff but I want to make that decision, not the federal government.

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            Perhaps it could be a model for Americans, especially the healthy lifestyle and the positive mental outlook, instead of the dissension we have in congress.

          • Fella says:

            Nice pipedream, but they also don’t have 320 million citizens. Their healthcare is also funded primarily at the Regional level (we’d call that a state). They also have a flat 25% VAT.

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            You call it a pipe dream, I call it thinking outside the box, something many in here are not guilty of. Yes, they have vat and income tax of 50% total but it does fund all healthcare, education and retirement taxes. I have spoken to a number of Danes that don’t mind paying the taxes for what they get.

          • Fella says:

            Again, in a small population, that will work. In America, we have different ideaology. We have people that crave money and power; we have people that couldn’t care less about either. We have people that donate millions of dollars every year, and some that donate ever penny that. We have unlucky people, lucky people, greedy people, and straight lazy people. In a socialist society that’s fine, for the most powerful country in the world, it’s not going to be viable. I’m thinking outside the box, and I’m thinking healthcare should be dealt with at the State level, like the Danes.

          • skisok says:

            I agree. I see this as nothing different than in funding DoD. Protecting our citizens either from extremists or from illnesses.

          • mandinka says:

            Hmmm you do realize that the Dutch are a homogeneous population. If the US was more like that there would be a sense of society. WE have a president that picks at ethnic groups so they are at war

          • Dave Larochelle says:

            Hmmmm you do realize that the Dutch are not the Danes, right?

    • theinnerring says:

      rates and deductibles have been going up for years, this is nothing new.

      • Rambo1957 says:

        This will not do anything for the rising costs of health care. There are many things that make it rise. Inflation, research, regulations, lawsuits. We can all think of something. In 2010 my insurance was $100 per month. It is going up to $ 131 in 2014. Very reasonable but still a 31% increase. My concerns are many but the costs will not be absorbed by the companies once those with pre existing conditions start draining the profit margins. I also see us still paying for those that pay the tax instead of purchasing insurance. Hospitals will still treat emergencies. I think we need to focus on the factors for the reasons on increases for health care.

        • mandinka says:

          Fixing the tort system will stop trial attorneys from stealing $400B a year from premiums. It would pay for the federal share of ACA

      • tiredofcrazy says:

        I’m a fed and covered under FEHB. My particular plan’s premium is going up about $5 per pay for 2014, for which I am grateful after hearing other stories. Out of curiousity, I went on the ACA website to see what the differences would be if we had to go that route. My husband and I are 52 and will have one of our children on the plan as well. The premiums doubled, the deductibles as well. Simple math says it all. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see the numbers, they are right in front of you as plain as the nose on your face.
        We have both worked since we were 18 years old. Now it seems the reward for being productive working Americans is having your earnings go to help those who are not working. Sorry, but that sucks no matter if you are Republican or Democrat.

    • skisok says:

      That’s been happening for years with your standard insurance policy. So what has changed? The only reason insurance is getting worse is because the American people as a whole are getting older. If you have a one payer system, you have a much better chance of keeping insurance and medical costs in check. The government should pay prospective Doctors education costs with the promise that thet will accept Medicare and ACA insurance for at least 15 years. This would increase the pool of doctors.

  6. John says:

    Does anyone know if the amount for FSA will again be limited to $2,500? Also, will the TSP max still be 17,500?

  7. HRGuy71 says:

    We are fortunate to be able to keep the FEHB program.

    No doubt, at least some who are close to retirement may get a better deal through the exchanges. Those who are younger, in good health and not likely to need extensive coverage are likely not to sign up as they are reportedly getting hit hard with rate increases so many will just bypass the system and pay the penalty (or the healthcare “tax” if you prefer to make this legislative mess pass constitutional muster). Reportedly, about 75% of the younger people are unaware of the requirement that they buy health insurance. Presumably, they will learn about it when they file their taxes next year and notice the extra charge they are encountering for not buying anything–and for failing to support the collective by paying through the nose in order to reduce the rates for those who are older, sicker, and may not have not had health insurance.

    • retired worker fed says:

      I do not know the exchanges prices. So, I cannot comment on that one. I was unaware that fed employees are not buying health insurance. It is up to 75% subsidized by our employer. Mine is about 70% subsidized.
      You write that 75% are unaware. But how many have it as employees? I hope you are not writing 75%.

      • HRGuy71 says:

        The 75% refers to young Americans are unaware that they will have to pay a penalty for not buying health insurance, most of them under 30. It is not referring to federal employees in particular.

        I do not know how many federal employees do not have health insurance.

        • retired worker fed says:

          How many of these people are employees and have it through work? Not just feds. And where does the 75% figure come from? Also, how many of these lack of knowledge people hav insurance anyway or are covered by their parents?

          • HRGuy71 says:

            Coverage available on the internet. Not hard to find: “Just 27 percent of people ages 19 to 29 were aware of the exchanges, which are set to open on Oct. 1, while 70 percent were unaware.

            The lack of knowledge was greatest among the very young people the administration most wants to enroll in the exchanges — those who had been uninsured in the past year and those with the lowest incomes.”

            Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/healt

          • retired worker fed says:

            OK. We have the 19-29 spread. 52% of the 19-25 are covered by parents. How many (% form) are covered by employer? with the 26-29 people we have the same issue except no parent coverage. The cite does not answer that question. All we know is that they do not know the law.

  8. Guest says:

    The only key facts I need to know: How much does it cost, and what’s no longer covered.
    ” if you think health care is expensive – wait until it’s free”.

    • retired worker fed says:

      How about was is covered?

    • lvmra says:

      You want “free” check out the Michael Moore movie “Sicko”. You would be shocked. Of course the GOP wouldn’t want you to see it.

      • NoDonkey says:

        Michael Moore is a documented liar, do you actually believe Cuban healthcare is a model we should emulate? Complete with the bribes necessary?

        • lvmra says:

          And are you saying that he bribed Canada, France and England also?? Maybe you should quit drinking the GOP Kool-Aid. and actually find out what other countries have instead taking it from Bill O’reilly.

          • steve5656546346 says:

            If you actually look at those countries, you will find that they have serious problems too.

            But nothing can change the fact that Michael Moore is a lying ideologue. Even if he is right, his arguments are wrong because he does not tell the truth.

          • lvmra says:

            Why don’t you enlighten us as to what serious problems they have

    • tiredofcrazy says:

      We are fortunate to have FEHB, and yes some of the premiums have gone up. I think that’s fairly normal. But as far as “Affordable”, from what I have seen the ACA is far from it. In researching premiums on the website, it would cost double out of pocket for us and then some for the premiums if not more. Once again, the workers of the middle class will be taking the brunt of it.

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