Court Cases

Some Case Law Surrounding Excessive Leave

By on September 2, 2016 in Court Cases, Human Resources with 23 Comments

The author says that one of the most time consuming and frustrating tasks for supervisors is dealing with the small number of employees who abuse leave. He describes some of the keys to dealing with these problems as well as some court cases that set precedent for what agencies can and can’t do in dealing with leave and attendance problems.

Continue Reading »

‘Job Restructuring’ as a Reasonable Accommodation in Federal Employment (Part 2)

By on September 1, 2016 in Court Cases, Human Resources with 6 Comments

In the second of two series of articles on job restructuring as a reasonable accommodation, the author explores how job restructuring could affect other employees besides the disabled person being accommodated, and examines the limitations on the burden that an agency may place on other employees.

Continue Reading »

33 People Charged with Crimes Against the Postal Service Including Mail Theft by Employees

By on August 27, 2016 in Agency News, Court Cases with 10 Comments
33 People Charged with Crimes Against the Postal Service Including Mail Theft by Employees

Crimes against the Postal Service seem rampant in one section of California. 33 people, including a number of Postal Service employees, have been charged with various crimes.

Continue Reading »

‘Job Restructuring’ as a Reasonable Accommodation in Federal Employment

By on August 25, 2016 in Court Cases, Human Resources with 4 Comments

In the first of two articles on job restructuring as a reasonable accommodation, the author explores how managers ascertain what an employee’s essential functions of his or her job position are, how to restructure a job position to accommodate an employee, and explores some cases that shed light on how the EEOC and federal courts look at these issues.

Continue Reading »

Poor Customer Service Leads to Removal

By on August 17, 2016 in Court Cases with 27 Comments
Poor Customer Service Leads to Removal

An IRS employee who cursed out a taxpayer in front of several witnesses could not persuade the court that his removal was unwarranted.

Continue Reading »

The Adjudication of Attendance

By on August 14, 2016 in Court Cases, Human Resources with 46 Comments
The Adjudication of Attendance

The author says that it is a well established fact that managers have the right to establish standards for requiring employee attendance at work. He notes, however, that failure to enforce attendance requirements can result in further attendance problems and lower morale among employees. He says that supervisors should never be afraid to initiate the appropriate action when warranted and cites some cases as precedent for enforcing consistent attendance in the federal workplace.

Continue Reading »

She Fought the Law and She Won

By on August 11, 2016 in Court Cases with 12 Comments

A PhD candidate at University of Virginia fought back when the Defense Department ruled she did not qualify for the education reduced fee exemption under the FOIA and therefore would have to pay the full $900 due in fees for the agency’s efforts. She won at the influential U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. She not only gets the reduced fee, her case sets a precedent that should affect how all agencies handle FOIA requests from students in the future.

Continue Reading »

When Private Emails Are Official Government Records

By on August 9, 2016 in Court Cases with 284 Comments

A Federal appeals court has ruled that an agency head’s email records that are stored on a private, non-government server are nevertheless official agency records reachable by a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request.

Continue Reading »

D.C. Circuit Court Rules Private Email Accounts Subject to FOIA

By on July 24, 2016 in Court Cases with 36 Comments

In a case of great significance for federal employees, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit overturned a lower court decision and ruled that “an agency cannot shield its records from search or disclosure” under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) “by the expedient of storing them in a private email account.” The author summarizes the case and what it means for federal workers.

Continue Reading »

Don't Just Look For the Management Label

The appeals court agrees with the Merit Systems Protection Board that just because an HR Specialist had access to confidential personnel databases and was labeled a manager by her agency does not mean that she was in a management position or one that otherwise gave the Board jurisdiction over her adverse action (demotion) appeal.

Continue Reading »

Top